Childlike Wonder

My daughter Arabella is two years old today. I cannot believe how much our lives have changed because of this little blond girl running around and enriching every moment with a sense of wonder and joy. She is obsessed with princesses, shoes, jewelry, magic, and beauty. I still harbor a secret hope that someday she will turn into a hunter that likes watching football shooting guns with her daddy. Given that she has not taken off her pair of glittering pink princess shoes since her grandma bought them (she even wears them to bed), I should stop holding my breath. Seeing the world through her eyes is always a treat for me as her father. Jesus understood something about the benefit from such a shift in perspective and the beauty of the world as seen through the eyes of a child.

Mark 10:13-16 – this is a great passage. Jesus is having a blast hanging out with some kids, and his disciples see this and make to remedy the situation. They come over to righteously defend their teachers importance and his lack of time for such a trivial thing as playing and such insignificant people as children. Their attitude leads to one of those moments when Jesus gets ticked off. He is indignant about their pride and assumption: to Jesus, there isn’t anything more important than what he is doing. And he uses the kids as a great object lesson – become like them if you want to get the Kingdom of God. So what can we learn from kids about life and about God? In what ways can we actually learn about spiritual maturity from the simple mind of a child?

Mystery – kids are okay with the unknown. They don’t feel they need to know everything. This doesn’t stop them from asking questions. Arabella is just getting to this age. She flips through her books and asks “What’s this?” “What’s that?” She looks at the world like it is a puzzle she is going to figure out if she just pays attention. Never will there be a group with more questions than children. They want to know if God is really invisible, or if that is just a trick. They want to know if God could make the sky green if he wanted to. Why don’t we have any questions anymore? Because we have moved on and become mature and we don’t like to admit we don’t know everything. Sometimes we focus on showing everyone what we know, not admitting what we don’t know. There are just some things we will never understand. Some of us have a hard time understanding girls. Others of you, you just don’t get guys. Good luck understanding your parents. Sometimes, we don’t even understand ourselves. There are questions in life that you and I can’t answer. We offer up platitudes. We make guesses; sometimes even educated guesses, but we really don’t know. For example, we don’t understand why good people suffer. Or why bad people prosper. We can’t understand why some people from a certain kind of background become criminals, while other people growing up under the same kind of circumstances become sterling citizens. The difference between kids and us is that they are okay with not knowing everything, while it drives us nuts. Kids have the potential for remarkable faith because of their comfort with the unknown.

Wonder – Kids are amazed by the simplest things. My daughter is impressed every time I make chocolate milk. She studies the way the milk and the chocolate swirl around and cheers when it is done. The older we get, the more difficult it becomes to impress us. We have lost our sense of wonder. I think it is because we have become so big that God has become smaller. I love what John the Baptist says about Jesus – “He must increase, and I must decrease.” Kids know they are small, and the world and God are huge! I love to see a kid that is amazed and impressed.

FUN – Why do kids have more fun than adults? Things that are common and routine to us are pure excitement to them. Running, jumping, dancing, music, games, and laughter. They laugh deep; energy that comes from their core. It isn’t just a courtesy laugh, you know, the little chuckle we give each other when something really isn’t funny but a laugh is appropriate or expected. Kids laugh from the gut, and it erupts out of them like pure, care free joy. Arabella reminds me every day about the simple reasons to laugh. Yesterday, we danced in the living room for 10 minutes with no music other than the melody of her contagious joy. Then she wanted to jump. Then she wanted to pretend to sleep while I pretended to be a pillow, complete with snoring sounds.

Kids don’t care if their clothes are the coolest, they don’t care if they have the best looking prom date, they don’t care about so much that is so superficial. Kids don’t worry about popularity or image. Think of the barriers that we have to deal with between us and serving God with abandon: our reputation, selfish agendas, our plans, our hang ups – kids just aren’t encumbered by this stuff. Jesus was on to something when he taught us to rediscover the faith of a child. If this is something you struggle with, come over and hang out with my 2 year-old. See the world through her eyes.